Giveaway Time For Writers! #amwriting #giveaway

I feel so blessed I’ve decided I’m doing a giveaway for writers. Later this year, I have the chance to teach an ongoing ‘master class’ to paying students on romance and fiction writing! My babies have gotten me noticed. To celebrate the publishing of the third book ( far right-hand side), and the new venture I’m doing a signed copy giveaway.

Here’s the link to enter and pick your book. Good luck.

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/75108b4123/?

Romance Writing: Is There Ever Too Much Sex? Erotica vs Romance- The Difference? #90DaysBlogChallenge #amwriting #blogchallenge

Well, in response to the #90DaysBlogChallenge in my personal view point, is there ever too much sex in romance stories? I feel that how it’s written can make it seem ‘too much.’ Rather than how much is written. Also, I feel if that (hot sex) is the main driver in a story that’s meant to be, or marketed as a romance, then it can come across as too much. I feel the latter as yes, I agree that there’s a massive difference between romance and erotica, in terms of genre, and the purpose they serve to myself as a reader and others. If the main driver is ‘hot sex’ as a selling point of the story, it really should be an erotica story. So, let me break this down.

Seriously, is it ever too much?

In romance sex may play a big part in the story, after all this is about people and their relationships. So sex will be normal, naturally for characters as it is for real people. It’s a way relationships develop you could say, so generally it’s to be expected in romance stories. Unless it’s a ‘sweet and clean’ type of story. Generally speaking for me as a big romance reader, and writer, I think that if romance writers think very carefully about where they place their sex scenes, what purpose it serves, and why their characters must get it on at that point in the story– this helps with reducing that cringe-worthy read feeling. Or the feeling a reader may have (myself included) of, ‘this is too much, shit I’m not gonna finish this book.’ This is what I mean by how sex is written rather than how much of it. Also, in addition to this if there’s pages and pages of it, that’s overly detailed, and leaves little to the imagination, and nothing else going on really in the story –yes as a reader I’ve felt it’s ‘too much.’ Again, that boils down to how it’s written. The main elements of what makes a romance a romance may also be missing, if sex is all that’s driving the plot. Which brings me back to the point I made earlier– maybe that’s an erotica story if that’s the case.

So what’s the difference between erotica and romance in your view, Kim?

I know that’s what you’re thinking, well what’s the difference? In all honesty for me erotica is sex driven not emotionally or even plot driven. To me the genre from what I have read of it, and clearly I know of it as a writer the main purpose it serves is more: the sexual tension, the sexy acts the characters get into themselves (BDSM, threesomes, carrying out fantasies etc). The plot is not always as dynamic as romance as the sexy acts can be such a big part of the story, and reason why the characters are together in the first place. This seems to be (from reading) what the main emphasis is on, in a lot of what I’ve read. It’s about the thrill of the chase yes but–sexually. Maybe you disagree, but this has just been my experience. I’d also generally say this as a writer too, I (and I’d guess most romance writers regardless of their sub-genre), write stories that are emotionally and plot driven. The emotional build up, tension (not always sexual think of romantic suspense as a sub-genre), and the growth and development characters often experience are a big factor of a story. The latter should be a feature if the writer has done a good job! Readers can feel and see it. Generally speaking also, the latter is not always something that is a heavy focus in erotica stories. It’s the power that’s in the sex scenes, rather than the power in emotionally tugging at a reader.

What about ‘steamy romance’?

Yes, let’s not forget this. I am a ‘steamy romance writer’ to the core. I find it very hard to write stories where characters just hold hands and walk in the park LOL. Those that pen wonderful romance and keep it clean, I commend them. It’s something I can’t really do– or maybe I just don’t wanna! Deep down. Steamy romance in my opinion is again different from erotica. I’d go as far as say I believe that ‘steamy romance’ is romance–emotionally and plot driven with growth for characters, a clear bond for characters over and above sexual attraction, even if sexual attraction is a feature in a story. To me it’s a label you can give romance stories that have all the features of a traditional romance but, it’s not ‘sweet and clean’, sex may feature a few times, and yes it may well be written in detail but not over the top. It’s different as again the main driver is not how ‘hot’ the sex is like erotica. The hot sex, adds to all the other romantic elements focused on.

So in a nutshell for me, nope there’s never too much sex in a romance as long as it’s well written, and not just thrown in for the sake of it. A lazy writer who can’t develop a romance, or romantically charged plot well, or feels that’s what’s needed to engage a reader (heaps of sex only), might fall back on this technique and call it ‘romance.’ To me it’s really not. Yes, there’s a massive difference between erotica and romance. No matter how steamy that romance is. The plot will always be over and above: ‘getting it on,’ having ‘hot sex scenes,’ or the thrill of the chase for characters is based on knowing what a sexual experience with another character might be like.

What do you think? Do you read either romance or erotica genres– is there a difference for you? Which one do you prefer?

What’s Your Favourite Kind Of Movie Scene?….. #amwriting

 

 

Didi and I are feeling a little (extra) creative this week. Are you a movie lover? For this week’s short story writing prompt, what’s your favourite kind of movie or scene in a movie? Is it action & adventure, erotic, romantic comedy, thriller and suspense… what?? We’ll create this week’s #kdsuspense short story, by starting the story randomly, using the  type of  movie scene with the most votes. We’ve left off a horror scene as … well… we wrote that  genre last week. Did you miss it ? It had blood, gore,sex and more 18 + reading. Read it here.  Thank you for voting! Don’t forget to write with us. We’d love to read your work. Post the link on one of our pages to see.

 

This Is How Kim & Didi’s Suspenseful Collection Works!

We never discuss beforehand how a story should go or who writes what. It’s a surprise for each other to see how their story ends, or what lands in their inbox to finish off.

This interactive writing challenge is simple and insanely creative. It’s a group effort and we are so glad to have you join in the writing fun!!  I hope you’re ready to challenge us by choosing which prompts we can transform into stellar suspense!  Give us your best shot!  You vote on our weekly prompt, and we provide the entertainment. It’s that simple!  The super easy steps are as follows:

STEP ONE: Every Wednesday we’ll post a voting poll with a few prompts to choose from.
STEP TWO: With the click of a button, you cast your vote on a prompt. (voting will stay open for three days.) Once the winning prompt is announced you can join us and write a story too. Use #kdsuspense to link in.
STEP THREE: READ AND ENJOY!  Every week on the following Tuesday we will post the short story that transformed from the very winning prompt.

Read Previous Stories Here!

Self Published Authors Talk to Kim & Sascha Darlington: How To Work With Reviewers & Remove Stigma. #author #amwriting #writerslife

I did a blog post last night about my views and personal thoughts, after reading on a book reviewer’s site……

“they won’t read books by self-published authors.”

WTF 2

Yeah, I felt the same when I read that. I was traditionally published before self published, I have a strong view point on this statement by book reviewers.  You can read the blog post here, which also lead to a conversation with Sascha in the comments. Interestingly she asked what she could do to help support self-published authors? Even though from what I understand, she has had a bad experience with some. Well I dunno? I guess try to keep reading work from self published authors.

But if you’re a self published author what could help improve the image self published authors have? And how can book reviewers support indie authors? Rather than have a hostile board-line discriminatory attitude toward those that do self publish. Oh and guys please what is your view on “vanity publishing” is that what it’s called these days? I did laugh have you heard this?

I have just a few things/ideas on this poll, add your own in the comments and do give feedback. It would be great for Sascha and I to hear all of your POV’s, as I am only good at talking up for myself… as you can probably tell 🙂